classicsenthusiast:

This will be the last part of this series, unless anyone has recommendations for words to cover for a Part 4.

(Part 1, Part 2)

Friendship

  • philia (φιλία) affectionate regard, friendship, friendly love
  • philotes (φιλότης) friendship, love, affection
  • arthmos (ἀρθμός) a bond,…
reblogged 7 minutes ago @ 20 Apr 2014 with 132 notes via/source

cantshinewith0utdarkness:

Some pictures from my trip to Ancient Olympia

reblogged 7 minutes ago @ 20 Apr 2014 with 152 notes via/source
bayoread:

hellenismo:

Τρίτη Μεσοῦντος/ Τρισκαιδεκάτη/ Τρίτη ἐπὶ δέκα, XIII dayFrom today’s sunset: thirteenth day of Mounychion.(Kronos devouring a horse, Rhea seated near Him. Christie’s, London, Catalogue des pierres graves antiques de S.A. le Prince Stanislas Poniatowski ([1830?]-1833), 5, Cornelian)

Kronos devouring an ass more like.
Rhea is like “Er..?”

bayoread:

hellenismo:

Τρίτη Μεσοῦντος/ Τρισκαιδεκάτη/ Τρίτη ἐπὶ δέκα, XIII day
From today’s sunset: thirteenth day of Mounychion.

(Kronos devouring a horse, Rhea seated near Him. Christie’s, London, Catalogue des pierres graves antiques de S.A. le Prince Stanislas Poniatowski ([1830?]-1833), 5, Cornelian)

Kronos devouring an ass more like.

Rhea is like “Er..?”

reblogged 7 minutes ago @ 20 Apr 2014 with 111 notes via/source

athens-archaeological-museum:

West pediment of the temple of Asklepios from Epidaurus (ca 380 B.C)

The pediment depicts the fight between the Amazons and the Greeks before the walls of Troy. Though in a highly fragmentary state of preservation, the central mounted figure might be queen Penthesilea fighting off two Greek soldiers- one of them Machaon, son of Asklepios.

Penthesilea is flanked by two more Amazons- on horse and on foot. Slain soldiers have fallen to the ground, while a dead Amazon is still on her horse.

reblogged 7 minutes ago @ 20 Apr 2014 with 64 notes via/source
bhollen8:

Ara Pacis, Rome

bhollen8:

Ara Pacis, Rome

reblogged 7 minutes ago @ 20 Apr 2014 with 421 notes via/source
classicsmatters:

an-amateur-roman:

NEVER FORGET

It’s coming…

classicsmatters:

an-amateur-roman:

NEVER FORGET

It’s coming…
reblogged 5 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 1,923 notes via/source
maddieatsbrains:

crowoftheeast
reblogged 5 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 207,652 notes via/source

historia-polski:

The Jewish Cemetery on Bracka street in Łódź
The first Jewish Cemetery in Łódź was established in 1811 on Wesoła street.  In the 1950s the location of the cemetery was converted into a housing complex.  Today its existence is marked by a stone obelisk erected in 2004 through an initiative put forth by the city president, Dr. Jerzy Kropiwnicki. 
The Bracka street cemetery was established in 1892.  An estimated 160,000 people are buried within its grounds, which stretch over an area of 98 acres, making it one of the largest Jewish cemeteries in Europe.  Over the course of its existence it became the final resting place to many prominent members of the Jewish community who were instrumental in the development of the city over the course of its history.  Rabbis, factory owners, doctors, politicians, and activists are among the many buried there.  Their monuments are often works of art in stone.
The cemetery is also a place of rest for the victims of one of the greatest tragedies in human history - the Holocaust.  In the section of the cemetery know as the “Ghetto Field” about 43,000 victims of the Łódź Ghetto are buried, who died as the result of disease and starvation.  Their graves are rarely marked by a matzeva.  In an attempt to restore the cemetery and the memory of its inhabitants a foundation was established.  In spite of other restorative work being done at the cemetery, the “Ghetto Field” section was a top priority, so that the living descendants of those who perished could properly mark the resting place of their loved ones.  The section itself became a kind of war memorial. (source)
reblogged 5 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 137 notes via/source

neatpotatoes:

when parents force you to do chores right when you get home

image

reblogged 5 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 26,754 notes via/source
zeezrom:

Female portrait, cd. Head Fonseca-early 2nd century AD marble, Musei Capitolini, Palazzo Nuovo, Rome.

zeezrom:

Female portrait, cd. Head Fonseca-early 2nd century AD marble, Musei Capitolini, Palazzo Nuovo, Rome.

reblogged 7 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 354 notes via/source

wanderlusttour:

Pompeii, Italy

reblogged 7 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 316 notes via/source
shrieking-affliction:

Diogenes was the shit.  He was easily one of the best philosophers ever.  He made himself the least wealthy person, hence living in a “Barrel”.  He also, upon seeing a child drinking from a river with his hands, smashed his only wooden bowl claiming to be “Bested by a child”.  He did public stunts to make a point towards customs and norms including eating in the marketplace in Athens which was generally not acceptable.  When Plato described humans as “Featherless Bipeds” he plucked a chicken and brought it to him, saying “here’s your man”.  Plato changed that description to “Featherless bipeds with arms”.  And here’s where it gets real.Diogenes the Cynic became well known all over.  In fact, Alexander the great, the one man who could have anyone killed just because, went out of his way to find him.  Upon meeting Diogenes, whom was laying on the ground, he said something to the extent of “Ah, the great Diogenes!  Is there anything that I, Alexander the Great, can do you?”.  Diogenes’ response was a crude “Yes, Get out of my sunlight.”But, however, Alexander came back another time, to find Diogenes sifting through a pile of bones.  Alex inquired “Diogenes, what are you doing sifting through that pile of bones?” Diogenes the Cynic responded “I’m trying to distinguish between the bones of your father, and that of a slave.  I cannot tell the difference.”  An insult that any man would want the other beheaded for indeed.  But no, not Alexander.  Alexander went on to later say that if he were not Alexander the Great, he would wish to be Diogenes.Dude’s a motherfuckingbadass.

shrieking-affliction:

Diogenes was the shit.  He was easily one of the best philosophers ever.  He made himself the least wealthy person, hence living in a “Barrel”.  He also, upon seeing a child drinking from a river with his hands, smashed his only wooden bowl claiming to be “Bested by a child”.  He did public stunts to make a point towards customs and norms including eating in the marketplace in Athens which was generally not acceptable.  When Plato described humans as “Featherless Bipeds” he plucked a chicken and brought it to him, saying “here’s your man”.  Plato changed that description to “Featherless bipeds with arms”.  

And here’s where it gets real.

Diogenes the Cynic became well known all over.  In fact, Alexander the great, the one man who could have anyone killed just because, went out of his way to find him.  Upon meeting Diogenes, whom was laying on the ground, he said something to the extent of “Ah, the great Diogenes!  Is there anything that I, Alexander the Great, can do you?”.  Diogenes’ response was a crude “Yes, Get out of my sunlight.”

But, however, Alexander came back another time, to find Diogenes sifting through a pile of bones.  Alex inquired “Diogenes, what are you doing sifting through that pile of bones?” Diogenes the Cynic responded “I’m trying to distinguish between the bones of your father, and that of a slave.  I cannot tell the difference.”  An insult that any man would want the other beheaded for indeed.  But no, not Alexander.  

Alexander went on to later say that if he were not Alexander the Great, he would wish to be Diogenes.

Dude’s a motherfuckingbadass.

reblogged 7 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 34,367 notes via/source
wookie-pussy:

thebacchant:


LORDE for Billboard Magazine






Love her hair

That’s why it’s so big, its full of secrets.

Hah!!! XD precisely!

wookie-pussy:

thebacchant:

LORDE for Billboard Magazine

Love her hair

That’s why it’s so big, its full of secrets.

Hah!!! XD precisely!

reblogged 7 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 72,526 notes via/source
reblogged 7 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 1,775 notes via/source
reblogged 7 hours ago @ 19 Apr 2014 with 11,762 notes via/source